DIVISION OF PLANT PATHOLOGY & MICROBIOLOGY
in The Department of Plant Sciences

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Forbes Building 303,
P.O. Box 210036,
Tucson AZ 85721-0036
(520) 621-1977, FAX (520) 621-7186


Dr. Michael A. McClure
Professor

Ph.D. (1964), University of California, Davis

e-mail: mcclure@ag.arizona.edu


Area of Interest:
Biology and control of plant parasitic nematodes; ultrastructure of nematodes and host-parasite interactions.

Research Goals:
Nematodes are omnipresent. They occupy almost every conceivable niche that is capable of supporting life, and are purported to be the most numerous animals in the world. Plant parasitic species that attack cultivated crops in the USA are responsible for damage exceeding $9,000,000,000 annually. I am interested in the interactions of nematodes with their host plants at the organismic, cellular, and molecular level. Currently my research is focused on the nematode surface coat, the outermost boundary between the nematode and its environment. Nematode survival is dependent upon exchange of materials across this boundary and through the body wall. The surface coat may also mediate host-parasite recognition systems, and is involved in the attachment of bacteria and fungi that parasitize nematodes. Immunological, biochemical, and ultrastructural methods are being utilized to characterize the surface coat and determine its origin. On the more practical side, my research interests include nematode population management by biological, cultural, and chemical methods. Experimental approaches include laboratory, greenhouse, and field experiments with a broad spectrum of biological and chemical agents, as well as cultural methods, to reduce nematode populations and sustain crop yields.

Selected Publications:

    Gravato-Nobre, M. J., McClure, M. A., Dolan, L., Calder, G., Davies, K. G., Mulligan, B., Evans, K., and Von Mende, N. 1999. Meloidogyne incognita surface antigen epitopes in infected arabidopsis roots. Journal of Nematology 31:212-223.

    McClure, M. A. and M.E. Schmitt. 1996. Control of citrus nematode with cadusafos. Journal of Nematology 28: 624-628.

    Ogallo, J.L., and McClure, M. A.. 1996. Systemic acquired resistance and susceptibility to root-knot nematodes in tomato. Phytopathology: 86:498-501

    Ogallo, J.L. and M.A. McClure. 1995. Induced resistance to Meloidogyne hapla by other Meloidogyne species on tomato and pyrethrum plants. Journal of Nematology 27:441-447

    Spiegel, Y. and M.A. McClure. 1995. The surface coat of plant parasitic nematodes: chemical composition, origin and biological role - a review. J. Nematol. 27(3):127-142

    Ogallo, J.L. and M.A. McClure. 1995. Induced resistance to Meloidogyne hapla by other Meloidogyne species on tomato and pyrethrum plants. Journal of nematology 27:502-510

    Spiegel, Y. and M.A. McClure. 1995. The surface coat of plant-parasitic nematodes: Chemical composition, origin, and biological role -- Review. Journal of Nematology 27:127-134<

    McClure, M.A. and Y. Spiegel. 1991. Role of the nematode surface coat in the adhesion of Clavibacter sp. to Anguina funesta and Anuina tritici. Parasitology 103:421-42.

    McClure, M.A. and N. von Mende. 1987. Induced salivation in Plant Parasitic Nematodes. Phytopathology. 77(10):1463-1469

    McClure, M.A. and A.F. Bird. 1976. The Tylenchid (Nematoda) egg shell: formation of the egg shell in Meloidogyne javanica. Parasitology. 72:29-39

    McClure, M.A., Misaghi, I. and E.L. Nigh. 1973. Shared antigens of parasitic nematodes and host plants. Nature. 244(5414):306-307


For more information contact:

Dr. Michael A. McClure
University of Arizona
303 Forbes Building
P.O. Box 210036
Tucson, AZ 85721-0036

Office Phone: (520)621-7161
Fax: (520)621-7186
e-mail: mcclure@ag.arizona.edu


http://cals.arizona.edu/PLP/faculty/mcclure.html
Last updated: September 13, 2006
2004 The University of Arizona. All contents copyrighted. All rights reserved.