The University of Arizona Cooperative Extension (reg)

  About the Journal

  Subscribe!

  Archive

  This Issue:
    2003 Highlights &
          2004 Changes
    Calendar of Events
    Things to Expect & Do
    An Agave Stalk
          Becomes A Nursery
    Pruning My Red Bird
          of Paradise
    Computer Corner
    Coping with those
          Irritating Weeds
    Who Am I?
    Experiencing the
          Wonders of
          Composting
    Going Bananas in the
          Desert
    Banana Recipes
    Small Trees for the
          Arizona Desert
    Spotting Nutrient
          Deficiencies
          in Citrus Leaves
    Word Wise
    Landscape Water Use
         Results are In
    Desert Willow
          Indigenous Imposter
    Book Review
    Master Gardener
          Journal Index
          of 2003


  Special
  Announcements:
Two Citrus Clinics

Master Gardener Journal  


N E O P H Y T E   N O O K



Small Trees for the Arizona Desert

by Mike Mekelburg,
Master Gardener


Where landscape trees are concerned, the best time to avoid pruning problems is before the tree is even put in the ground. The key is to know how much area you have to work with, so you don't purchase a tree that overfills its space as it matures.

Tucson Botanical Gardens has compiled an extensive list of small trees for urban spaces in southern Arizona. The following is a list of a few highly recommended examples:

MULGA
(Acacia aneura)
Praised for its compact, up-right growth habit, this attractive gray tree from Australia looks good with Sonoran plants.

BLACKBRUSH
(Acacia rigidula)
Slow growing to 10 or 12 feet and long-lived, this tree resembles Texas Ebony.

PALO BLANCO
(Acacia willardiana)
Excellent for planting close to structures, because it is slow growing and does not produce lateral branches.


TEXAS OLIVE
(Cordia boissieri)
This attractive tree has large evergreen leaves and long-blooming white flowers. It tends to stay under 15 feet in height.


TEXAS EBONY
(Ebano ebenopsis)
Very thorny, but its glossy dark foliage lends a tropical effect to a garden.

DESERT FERN TREE
(Lysiloma watsoni)
This is a clean native tree with lush, fern-like foliage.

DESERT MUSEUM PALO VERDE
(Parkinsonia)
A very fast grower that will reach 20 feet. It blooms heavily with yellow and orange flowers.

TEXAS MOUNTAIN LAUREL
(Sophora secundiflora)
A shrub-like tree with glossy leaves and purple flowers that smell like grape Kool-Aid.


CHASTE TREE
(Vitex agnus-castus)
A deciduous tree with purple or white flowers in sum-mer. It should be kept away from sidewalks due to its BB-like fruit litter.

FUCHSIA GUM
(Eucalyptus forrestiana)
A very small tree, good for patios or large pots.


Maricopa County Master Gardener Volunteer Information
Last Updated January 23, 2004
Author: Lucy K. Bradley, Extension Agent Urban Horticulture, University of Arizona Cooperative Extension, Maricopa County
© 1997 The University of Arizona, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cooperative Extension in Maricopa County
Comments to Maricopa-hort@ag.arizona.edu 4341 E. Broadway Road, Phoenix, AZ 85040,
Voice: (602) 470-8086 ext. 301, Fax (602) 470-8092