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The Master Gardener Journal


T H I N G S   T O   E X P E C T   A N D   T H I N G S   T O   D O


From the Maricopa County Agriculture Extension web site:
http://cals.arizona.edu/maricopa/garden/html/t-tips/t-tips.htm

TURF

December Turf
. Fertilize winter lawns monthly with ammonium nitrate, potassium nitrate or calcium nitrate. Follow application directions on package. Use as needed to maintain good color (usually once every three weeks).
. Identify and correct problems with winter laws quickly.

VEGETABLES

November Vegetables
Plant Seeds
Beets, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Chard, Collard Greens, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce (Head & Leaf), Mustard, Onions (Bulb & Green), Peas, Radishes, Rutabagas, Spinach, Turnips.

Plant Transplants
Asparagus, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage, Cauliflower, Chard, Kohlrabi, Lettuce (Head & Leaf).

December Vegetables
Plant Seeds
Beets, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Collard Greens, Lettuce (Head & Leaf), Mustard, Green Onions, Peas, Radishes, Spinach, Turnips.

Plant Transplants
Asparagus, Broccoli, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kohlrabi, Lettuce (Head & Leaf)
Both months: Watch for insect and pest problems, identify and manage early to prevent damage.

ROSES

November Roses
End the year's fertilization this month
Plant container roses from mail-order catalogs, old garden roses in particular.

December Roses
New rose catalogs come out and bare root roses are available at nurseries from the middle to the end of the month.

FRUIT AND NUT TREES

Be prepared to protect citrus from early winter frosts.
Wrap the trunks of young citrus and other cold-tender trees with cloth, cardboard or several layers of newspaper (NOT plastic) to protect them from the winter freeze. Leave them wrapped until the threat of frost has passed in the Spring.
Peel color is not a good indicator of maturity or taste in citrus. Give it the taste test. If it is not sweet enough for your liking, leave it on the tree. Up to a point, the longer the fruit is left on the tree the sweeter.


Deciduous fruit trees must receive sufficient chilling for their flower buds to develop properly. Different varieties have different "chilling requirements." In order to have good fruit set, even in milder winters, choose a variety that requires less than 400 hours of chilling.

LANDSCAPE PLANTS

November Landscape Plants
Cut off spent blooms to stimulate re-bloom.
Water applications should be greatly reduced for the winter.
Plant winter hardy trees, shrubs and vines.
Pre-emergent herbicides can be applied from October through early December for winter annual weed control. Follow the package directions carefully for best results. DO NOT use pre-emergent herbicides where you will be planting seeds this season.
Be prepared for early winter frost.

December Landscape Plants
Cut off spent blooms to stimulate re-bloom.
Reduce irrigation to one deep watering of the root zone per month for the winter.
Plant winter hardy trees, shrubs and vines.
Pre-emergent herbicides can be applied from October through early December for winter annual weed control. Follow the package directions carefully for best results. DO NOT use pre-emergent herbicides where you will be planting seeds this season.
Be prepared for early winter frost.

DON'T . . .

Do not increase opportunities for fungal disease on turf by over watering or watering at night.

DO NOT OVER WATER, this results in root rot. Allow the soil to dry out between watering.


Maricopa County Master Gardener Volunteer Information
Last Updated November 21, 2004
Author: Lucy K. Bradley, Extension Agent Urban Horticulture, University of Arizona Cooperative Extension, Maricopa County
© 1997 The University of Arizona, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cooperative Extension in Maricopa County
Comments to Maricopa-hort@ag.arizona.edu 4341 E. Broadway Road, Phoenix, AZ 85040,
Voice: (602) 470-8086 ext. 301, Fax (602) 470-8092