Developing Nitrogen Application Guidelines for Medjool Dates

Woven fabric sacks are placed over Medjool date clusters to prevent bird damage. The sacks are tied at the bottom until the dates are mature. At harvest the ends of the sacks are untied, allowing the dates to fall gently into baskets.
Woven fabric sacks are placed over Medjool date clusters to prevent bird damage. The sacks are tied at the bottom until the dates are mature. At harvest the ends of the sacks are untied, allowing the dates to fall gently into baskets.

Medjool dates are among the largest, softest and sweetest in the world. And they are the primary date grown in California’s Bard Valley and in neighboring Yuma, Arizona. The combined region produces about 30 million pounds of dates annually—99 percent of them Medjools—with an estimated value of $40 million.

With date acreage expanding in the Yuma area, and the demand (and price) for Medjools increasing, successful refinements in production practices can make a difference in yields and in crop returns. That is the goal of an industry-sponsored nitrogen application study conducted by Glenn Wright, associate research scientist at the Yuma Valley Agricultural Center—to determine nitrogen requirements for Medjool date palms that will optimize tree growth, yield and fruit quality.

Date released: 
Aug 5 2010
Contact: 
Glenn Wright