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ENTOMOLOGY: INSECT PESTS [continued]

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  MG Manual Reference
Ch. 3, pp. 54 - 55
[ Insect Pests: ipm | landscape; foliage, sap, trunk, root | turf grass; root, leaf, sap, nuisance | household; structures, living quarters, products | outdoor | citrus | fruits | gardens ]


PESTS OF DECIDUOUS FRUITS AND NUTSTop

Lepidoptera

Codling Moth
The adult codling moth is grayish-brown and white, and is approximately 1/2 inch long. With its wings folded it has a dark semi-circle at the hind edge of the forewings. It appears in the spring when the apples are beginning to blossom.
Codling Moth
Codling Moth
The larvae are pinkish caterpillars known as appleworms found in apples and pears. They tunnel through the fruit causing considerable destruction of tissue. Damage can be prevented in backyard orchards by placing paper bags over any fruit that has set about two weeks after the blossom petals have fallen. This prevents the first worms, which generally enter the fruit about 3 to 4 weeks after blossom fall. There are several generations per year.
Peach Tree Borer Adult
Peach Tree Borer Adult
Peach Tree Borer
Adult peach tree borers are glassy, dark blue moths that resemble wasps. Their hind wings are transparent, and they have orange on their abdomen. Larvae are about an inch long, white with a brown head. The larvae bore in the crown area of stone fruits and almonds. Damage is indicated by masses of gum and brown castings on the trunk. Peach-tree borer larvae overwinter under the bark near the groundline.
Peach Twig Borer
Adult moths are steel gray with white and dark scales. They are about 1/4 inch long with narrow, fringed wings. The adults are active at night and hide in crevices in the bark during the day. The larvae are pinkish to dark brown in color and bore into twigs and buds of fruit trees in the spring. Their activity stops growth or kills the shoot. Pupation occurs within silken cocoons on the twigs and trunk of the tree. There may be a second and third generation that bore into twigs or fruit.
Peach twig borers attack peaches, plums, apricots, almonds, nectarines, and cherries.
Leaf-footed Bug
Leaf-footed Bug
Hemiptera

Leaf-footed Bug
There are several species of leaf-footed bug, but all are about one inch long, and dark gray or brown with leaf-like enlargements on their hind legs. They are closely related to squash bugs, and give off an odor when handled. The nymphs are bright red and black with less prominent extensions on their hind legs. They feed on the fruits of a number of different plants, including oranges, peaches, pecans, tomatoes and especially pomegranates. They suck the juices out and may carry a bacteria which causes pocket rotting.
Destroy any bugs that are found. Immature fruits may be covered with paper bags.
Black Pecan Aphid
Black Pecan Aphid
Homoptera

Black Pecan Aphid
Adult aphids have a series of black tubercules on the back and sides. The first symptom of damage is angular yellow patches between the veins on the leaves of pecan or hickory. As the number of aphids increase, the yellow areas come together and the leaf may drop prematurely. Encourage natural enemies or wash aphids off with a hose.

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