Cooperative Extension
Arrow
MG Manual Home
Arrow
Fruit Trees
Arrow
Logo    

FRUIT TREES: INTRODUCTION
  MG Manual Reference
Ch. 11, pp. 2 - 4

[Introduction: considerations | foundation | nursery stock ]

CONSIDERATIONS Top

Growing tree fruit is a form of permanent gardening and requires more work than simply planting and harvesting. Certain cultural practices must be followed to achieve good yields of excellent quality fruit. Annual cultural practices involved in the production of high quality fruit are pruning, fertilization, irrigation, weed control, disease and insect control, bird control, fruit thinning and harvesting. Each kind of fruit has specific methods to achieve these practices. It is important to understand and practice these basic principles for full enjoyment of home grown fruit.
Once you have made the decision to grow tree fruit follow these guidelines for success.
Plan Wisely
• Determine the kind(s) of fruit you want to grow, eat and/or process
• Determine how much you want to harvest
• Properly space trees to prevent overcrowding later on
• Consider dwarf and container grown trees
• Select kind and varieties adapted to your location
• Purchase top quality nursery stock
Plant and Grow
• Select and prepare soil properly for maximum root growth
• Plant according to proven instructions
• Perform cultural techniques in a timely function
Table 1.

Space Requirement, Yield, Bearing Age, Pollination Requirement and Life Expectancy of Tree Fruits


Fruit Minimum Distance Between Plants (Feet) Approximate Yield per Plant (bushels) Bearing Age (years) Pollination Requirement Life Expectancy (years)
Apple
(standard)
25 8 6 to 10 cross 35 to 45
Apple
(semi-dwarf)
18 4 4 to 6 cross 20 to 25
Apple
(dwarf)
12 1 2 to 3 cross 15 to 20
Apricot 18 2 4 self 25 to 30
Almond 25 40 - 50 lbs. 5 cross 40 to 50
Cherry
(sour)
20 60 qt. 4 to 5 self 15 to 20
Cherry
(sweet)
25 75 qt. 5 to 7 cross 20 to 30
Fig 15 25 lbs. 2 self 30 to 40
Pear
(standard)
25 3 5 to 8 cross 35 to 45
Pear
(dwarf)
12 1/2 3 to 4 cross 15 to 20
Peach or nectarine 18 4 3 to 4 self 15 to 20
Persimmon 25 2 to 3 4 self 30 to 35
Plum 18 2 4 to 5 cross 15 to 20
Pomegranate 8 2 to 3 3 self 25 to 30
Quince 15 1 5 to 6 self 30 to 40
Walnut 35 50 to 100 lbs. 8 self 60+
Protect CropTop
• Observe plants for unusual growth patterns
• Watch for insects and have identified
• Note any unusual disease problems
• Use netting to prevent bird intrusion
• Practice sanitation and weed control
• Use natural means to protect tree and fruit when possible
Good advance planning will pay dividends in the long run. Survey your yard or property to identify soil conditions, exposure to sun, available space and climate factors. Identify sources of shade, boundaries and pipelines. Above all, start small and increase the size of your planting once you develop a knowledge of caring for trees. You may be surprised at the large quantity of fruit a few trees will yield.

Next Next
Search Index Comment

This site was developed for the Arizona Cooperative Extension, College of Agriculture, The University of Arizona.
© 1998 The University of Arizona. All contents copyrighted. All rights reserved.