Recent CALS Spotlights

  • Anivax and the University of Arizona have announced an agreement to license several technologies developed in a broad-based collaborative effort between the UA and Arizona State University. The license is for a revolutionary Campylobacter food safety vaccine designed to be administered to poultry to reduce colonization by the bacteria and ultimately lower the incidence of human disease and associated conditions.

    The team of inventors includes individuals from both institutions, including: Bibiana Law, associate research professor in the UA School of Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Anivax’s chief science officer; Alexandra Armstrong, assistant research scientist in the UA School of Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences, Food Safety Consortium chair and Anivax’s VP of research; Michael Anderson, Anivax’s VP of products with 25 years of vaccine commercialization experience; and Roy Curtiss III, of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University.

  • Advances in technology have had a major impact on the way consumers shop. But even with all the retail websites and apps at shoppers' fingertips today, physical stores remain at the center of the retail experience.

    That was one of the major take-home messages from last week's Global Retailing Conference, which focused on the theme of retail being "everywhere at once."

    The two-day conference, hosted by the University of Arizona's Terry J. Lundgren Center for Retailing, drew more than 100 UA students and about 300 industry professionals to the Westin La Paloma Resort and Spa to discuss where the retail industry is headed.

  • Mosquitoes could carry new troubles to Arizona.

    Dengue Fever and a second disease, Chikungunya, have started to crop up in areas surrounding Arizona, putting researchers on high alert about the looming threat the diseases could pose to the state.

    Both of these viruses are known as vector-borne diseases, carried and passed by mosquitoes. One particular type of mosquito, known as the Aedes Aegypti is a known carrier for both Dengue Fever and Chikungunya, and southern Arizona happens to be within this insect’s habitat.

  • Bruce Tabashnik, professor and head of entomology in the University of Arizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, has been awarded the Henry and Phyllis Koffler Prize for Research/Scholarship/Creative Activity.

    The award was presented at the annual Awards of Distinction Ceremony luncheon recently at the Student Union Memorial Center on campus.

    Sponsored by the UA provost, the prize was established through the generosity of Henry and Phyllis Koffler in 2000 and consists of a one-time award of $10,000, a medallion and a certificate.

  • Patrons at Rillito Park Race Track in northwest Tucson may have noticed a new presence during the recently completed spring race meet: young adults, dressed in navy shirts, on the TV screens, in the admissions booths and in the racing office. 

    Students from the University of Arizona’s Race Track Industry Program in the School of Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences, part of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, had the opportunity to learn about the industry firsthand through a collaboration with the local track. They worked in different capacities at the track and in the classroom on projects related to the track’s operations.

  • Some are vacuumed. Some are swept. Others are crushed, baited or trapped. The rest are kept out with caulk, window screens, door sweeps or, as a last resort, sprayed with chemicals.

    In some schools, the spray comes first.

    “We have a season that never stops,” said University of Arizona entomologist Dawn Gouge, about school pests in the state. “We have pest issues all year round.”

    Many school districts have their schools sprayed with pesticides at least once a month to prevent or kill pests such as cockroaches and ants, Gouge said.

  • Kejun Li asks a question: What does a credit card have in common with tree rings?

    The answer is in Li's art — spiraling, archival digital-art prints he created by smearing an expired credit card in the style of Chinese brush paintings. The prints directly mimic the cross section of a tree and its rings in a way that is so striking and precise that people have asked Li, a graduating University of Arizona Master of Fine Art student, whether his works are actually X-rays.

  • When people hear the word "retail," they might automatically think of a brick-and-mortar store with a clerk behind the counter. But retail today is more than that – much more – says Joan Sweeney, interim director of the UA's Terry J. Lundgren Center for Retailing.

    "Retail is everywhere," Sweeney says. "Retail is the engine of American business. We're a consumer society, and two-thirds of the U.S. GDP flows through retail.

  • The world today is more intimate and tightly wound together than ever before. Organizations are linked together in a variety of ways, allowing relationships to form and resources to be exchanged.

    Matt Mars of the University of Arizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Judith Bronstein from the UA College of Science have teamed up to better understand the natural properties of the networks that tie together human actors and organizations. The U.S. Department of Defense is interested in their research as a way to analyze terrorist networks.

  • A veterinary medical education program unlike any other in North America is being created at the University of Arizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, with an innovative curriculum that will create jobs, student opportunity and build the state’s economic prosperity.

    "We’re going to break the mold and create the first of a (new) generation of veterinary education programs designed for the 21st century," said Dr. Bonnie Buntain, the new coordinator of the UA’s Veterinary Medical and Surgical Program.