"Doing what little one can to increase the general stock of knowledge is as respectable an object of life,
as one can in any likelihood pursue." Charles Darwin



This page contains more information than even my mother would appreciate--would you like to:

        Examine my Curriculum Vitae?  A pdf version (that is more complete and may be more up-to-date) can be found here
        See a list of my Publications?
        Learn more about my Current Research and Past Research Projects and the students with whom I have collaborated?
 
 

CURRICULUM VITAE 

John L. Koprowski
Wildlife and Fisheries Science
School of Natural Resources
Institute of the Environment
306 Biological Sciences East

University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ  85721

Phone: (520) 626-5895 (Office)             Fax:  (520) 621-8801            E-mail:  squirrel@ag.arizona.edu

Education:

     University of Kansas                                       Ph.D.(Honors) Biology, 1991, Postdoctoral Studies, 1991-92
                                                                                        Advisor: Kenneth B. Armitage
     Dissertation:The evolution of sociality in tree squirrels: the comparative behavioral ecology of fox squirrels and
                                   eastern gray squirrels.

     Southern Illinois University                             M.A. Zoology, 1985
                                                                                        Advisor: W.D. Klimstra
     Thesis: Fox squirrel population trends and regulation in a southern Illinois woodlot, 1968-1984.

     Ohio State University                                      B.S. Zoology, 1983
                                                                                        Advisors: John Harder & Tony Peterle
     Undergraduate Research Thesis: Nocturnal activity of woodchucks (Marmota monax) in an urban park

Publications (* designates undergraduate student author)....Publications and pdf copies
                                            are undergoing transfer to another site...most can
                                            be found under 'Publications' HERE 
   

Books:

Steele, M. and J.L. Koprowski. 2001.  North American Tree Squirrels.   Smithsonian Institution Press.
Sanderson, HR, Koprowski, JL. (eds).  2009. Ecology of Endangerment: The Mt. Graham Red Squirrel and
    its Last Refuge, University of Arizona Press.

Book Chapters and Journal Articles:

Koprowski, J.L., N. Rajamani. 2007. Global hotspots, centers of diversity, and conservation of the tree
    and flying squirrels. Current Science 92: In press.

Koprowski, J.L. 2007. Reproductive strategies and alternative reproductive tactics of tree squirrels. In:
     Wolff, J. Sherman, P (eds). Rodent Societies.  University of Chicago Press. In press.

Lurz, P.W.W., J.L. Koprowski, D.J.Wood. 2007. The use of GIS and modelling approaches in squirrel
    population management and conservation: a review.  Current Science 92: In press.

Edelman, A.J., J.L. Koprowski. 2007. Communal nesting in asocial Abert’s squirrels: the role of
    social thermoregulation and breeding strategy. Ethology 113: 147-154.  Contact me for a PDF

Merrick, M., S.R. Bertelsen, J.L. Koprowski. 2007. Nest site selection by endangered Mt. Graham red
     squirrels.  Journal of Wildlife Management, 71: In press.

Edleman, A.J., J.L. Koprowski. 2007. Influence of female-biased sexual size dimorphism on dominance
    of female Townsend´s chipmunks. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 85: 1859-1863. PDF

Johnson, H., P.R. Krausman, V. Bleich, J.L. Koprowski.  2007. Effects of antler breakage on mating
    Behavior in male Tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes).  European Journal of Wildlife Research,
    53: 9-15. PDF

Wood, D.J., J.L. Koprowski, P. Lurz. 2007. How small is too small?  PVA assessment of tree squirrel
    reintroduction and ability to recover from small population sizes.  Journal of Mammalogy 87: In
    press.

Wood, D.J., S. Drake, S.P. Rushton, D. Rautenkranz, P.W.W. Lurz and J.L. Koprowski.  2007. Fine
    scale analysis of Mount Graham red squirrel habitat following disturbance. Journal of Wildlife
    Management 71:In press.

Zugmeyer, C.A., J.L. Koprowski.  2007. Avian nest predation by endangered Mt. Graham red squirrels.
    Southwestern Naturalist, 52: In press.

Koprowski, J.L., R.J.Steidl.  2007. The dilemma of the small population: potential consequences of the
     isolation of Mt. Graham red squirrels.  In: Sanderson, HR, Koprowski, JL. (eds).  Ecology of
     Endangerment: The Mt. Graham Red Squirrel and its Last Refuge (tentative title), University of
     Arizona Press. Accepted in final form

Alanen, M I, Koprowski, J L, Grinder M I, Greer, V L., Coates, C A, Hutton, K A. 2007. Habitat
    characteristics of the territories of Mt. Graham red squirrels: do sex differences exist? In:
    Sanderson, HR, Koprowski, JL. (eds).  Ecology of Endangerment: The Mt. Graham Red Squirrel
    and its Last Refuge (tentative title), University of Arizona Press.  Accepted in final form.

Edelman, AE, JL Koprowski. 2007. Introduced Abert's squirrels on Mt. Graham: Could they be
    contributing to the decline of the red squirrel. In: Sanderson, HR, Koprowski, JL. (eds).  Ecology
    of Endangerment: The Mt. Graham Red Squirrel and its Last Refuge (tentative title), University
    of Arizona Press. Accepted in final form.

Greer, VL, JL Koprowski. 2007.  Time budget of the Mt. Graham red squirrel. In: Sanderson, HR,
    Koprowski, JL. (eds).  Ecology of Endangerment: The Mt. Graham Red Squirrel and its Last
    Refuge (tentative title), University of Arizona Press. Accepted in final form.

King, SRB, JL Koprowski.  2007. Effect of human and non-human disturbance on Mt. Graham Red
    Squirrels.  In: Sanderson, HR, Koprowski, JL. (eds).  Ecology of Endangerment: The Mt.
    Graham Red Squirrel and its Last Refuge (tentative title), University of Arizona Press. Accepted
    in final form.

Koprowski, J.L., T. Snow. 2007. A comparison of the census methods used to monitor Mt. Graham red
    squirrels. In: Sanderson, HR, Koprowski, JL. (eds).  Ecology of Endangerment: The Mt. Graham
     Red Squirrel and its Last Refuge (tentative title), University of Arizona Press. Accepted in final
     form.

Munroe, K.E, J.L. Koprowski, V.L. Greer. 2007. The social and mating systems of red squirrels: do Mt.
    Graham red squirrels fit the pattern? In: Sanderson, H.R, Koprowski, J.L. (eds).  Ecology of
    Endangerment: The Mt. Graham Red Squirrel and its Last Refuge (tentative title), University of
    Arizona Press. Accepted in final form.

Bertelsen, S.R., J.L. Koprowski. 2007. Site characteristics of traditional and newly established middens
     of the Mount Graham red squirrel. In: Sanderson, H.R., Koprowski, J.L. (eds).  Ecology of
     Endangerment: The Mt. Graham Red Squirrel and its Last Refuge (tentative title), University of
     Arizona Press. Accepted in final form.

Pasch, B.S., J.L. Koprowski. 2006. Annual cycles in body mass and reproduction of Chiricahua fox
    squirrels (Sciurus nayaritensis chiricahuae).  Southwestern Naturalist, 51: In press.

Edelman, A.J., J.L. Koprowski. 2006. Seasonal changes in home ranges of Abert’s squirrels: impact of
    mating season and a novel habitat. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 84: 404-411. PDF

Koprowski, J.L., N. Ramos, B.S. Pasch, C.A. Zugmeyer. 2006. Observations on the ecology of the
    endemic Mearns’s Squirrel (Tamiasciurus mearnsi).  Southwestern Naturalist, 51:426-430. PDF

Rushton, S, D.J. Wood, P. Lurz, J.L. Koprowski. 2006. Population viability analysis of the Mt. Graham
    red squirrel: can we predict its future in a changing environment?  Biological Conservation, 131:
    121-131. PDF

Koprowski, J.L., K.M Leonard, C.J. Zugmeyer, J.L. Jolley.  2006. Direct effects of fire on endangered
    Mt. Graham red squirrels. Southwestern Naturalist, 51: 59-63. PDF

Edelman, A.J., J.L. Koprowski. 2006. Characteristics of Abert’s squirrel (Sciurus aberti) cavity nests.
    Southwestern Naturalist, 51: 64-70. PDF

Pasch, B. S., J. L. Koprowski. 2006. Sex differences in space use of Chiricahua fox squirrels.
     Journal of Mammalogy, 87: 380-386. PDF

Koprowski, JL. 2005. Annual cycles in body mass and reproduction in the endangered Mt. Graham
    red squirrel, a montane island endemic. Journal of Mammalogy, 86:30-313. PDF

Koprowski, J.L., M.I. Alanen, A.M. Lynch. 2005. Nowhere to run and nowhere to hide: response of
    endemic Mt. Graham red squirrels to catastrophic forest damage. Biological Conservation, 127:
    491-498. PDF

Koprowski, JL. 2005. Response of tree squirrels to habitat fragmentation: a review and synthesis.  Animal
    Conservation 8: 369-376. PDF

Koprowski, JL, MC Corse. 2005. Activity, time budgets, and behavior of Mexican fox squirrels. Journal
    of Mammalogy 86: 947-956. PDF

Edelman, A.J., J.L. Koprowski. 2005. Diet and tree use of Abert's squirrels (Sciurus aberti) in a mixed-
    conifer forest. Southwestern Naturalist, 50: 461-465. PDF

Edelman, A.J., J.L. Koprowski. 2005. Selection of drey sites by Abert's squirrels in an introduced
    population: the role of structure versus tree species.  Journal of Mammalogy 86: 1220-1226. PDF

Koprowski, J.L., G.T. Kellison, S.L. Moneysmith. 2005. Status of red-bellied squirrels (Sciurus
    aureogaster) introduced to Elliott Key, Florida.  Florida Field Naturalist, 33: 128-129.

Koprowski, JL. 2005. Management and conservation of tree squirrels: the importance of endemism,
    species richness, and forest condition. Pp. 245-250 In Biodiversity and Management of the
    Madrean Archipelago II. Proceedings RMRS-P-36. (Gottfried, G. J., Gebow, B. S., Eskew, L.
    G., and C. Edminster, eds.) United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky
    Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins.  PDF

Koprowski, J.L, A.J. Edelman, B.S. Pasch, D.J. Buecher. 2005. A dearth of data on mammals in the
    Madrean Archipelago: what we think we know and what we do know. Pp. 413-415 In
    Biodiversity and Management of the Madrean Archipelago II. Proceedings RMRS-P-36.
    (Gottfried, G. J., Gebow, B. S., Eskew, L. G., and C. Edminster, eds.) United States Department
    of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins. PDF

Edelman, A.J., J.L. Koprowski, J.L. Edelman.  2005.  Kleptoparasitic behavior and species richness at
    Mt. Graham red squirrel middens. Pp. 395-398. In Biodiversity and Management of the Madrean
    Archipelago II. Proceedings RMRS-P-36. Gottfried, G. J., Gebow, B. S., Eskew, L. G., & Edminster,
    C. (Eds). RMRS-P-36. Fort Collins: United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
    Rocky Mountain Research Station.  PDF

Pasch, B.S., J.L. Koprowski. 2005. Correlates of vulnerability in Chiricahua Fox Squirrels. Pp. 426-428.
    In Biodiversity and Management of the Madrean Archipelago II. Proceedings RMRS-P-36.
    (Gottfried, G. J., Gebow, B. S., Eskew, L. G., and C. Edminster, eds.) United States Department
    of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins.  PDF

Koprowski, J.L. 2005 (July 20). Pine Squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus): a technical conservation
    assessment. [Online]. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region. Available:
    http://www.fs.fed.us/r2/projects/scp/assessments/pinesquirrel.pdf

McColgin, M., E. Brown, S. Bickford, A. Eilers, J.Koprowski. 2003. Coati use of Century Plants.
    Southwestern Naturalist, 48:722-725. PDF

Hutton, K., J. Koprowski, V. Greer, M. Alanen, Schauffert, C., P. Young. 2003. Use of spruce-fir
    forests by introduced Abert's squirrels. Southwestern Naturalist, 48:257-260. PDF

Schauffert, C., J. Koprowski, V. Greer, M. Alanen, K. Hutton. 2002. Interactions between predators
    and Mt. Graham red squirrels.  Southwestern Naturalist, 47:498-501. PDF

Koprowski, J.L. 2002. Handling tree squirrels with an efficient and safe restraint. Wildlife
    Society Bulletin, 30:101-103. PDF

Koprowski, J.L. 2002. Book Review: An Atlas of Oregon Wildlife.  Journal of Mammalogy 82.

Koprowski, J.L. 2002. Book Review: Animal Behavior.  Journal of Mammalogy 82.

Koprowski, J.L., M.C. Corse.  2001.  Food habits of Chiricahua Fox Squirrels (Sciurus
    nayaritensis chiricahuae).   Southwestern Naturalist, 46:62-65. PDF

Koprowski, J.L., N. Perigo.  2000. Cooperative learning as a tool to teach vertebrate anatomy.
     American Biology Teacher, 26:282-284.  PDF

Koprowski, J.L. 1998. Conflict between the sexes: a review of social and mating systems of the
     tree squirrels. Pp. 33-41 in M.A. Steele, J.F. Merritt, D.A. Zegers (eds.), Ecology and
     Evolutionary Biology of Tree Squirrels, Special Publication 6, Virginia Museum of
     Natural History.  310 pp.

Koprowski, J.L. and M.A. Steele.  1998.  Future directions: Research on the ecology of tree
     squirrels. Pp. 309-310 in M.A. Steele, J.F. Merritt, D.A. Zegers (eds.), Ecology and
     Evolutionary Biology of Tree Squirrels, Special Publication 6, Virginia Museum of
     Natural History.  310 pp.

Koprowski, J.L. 1997.  Honing the craft of scientific writing: the role of peer review.  Journal
    of College Science Teaching, 27:133-135.

Koprowski, J.L. 1996. Natal philopatry, communal nesting, and kinship in fox squirrels and
     eastern gray squirrels. Journal of Mammalogy, 77: 1006-1016.  PDF

Koprowski, J.L. 1996. Book Review of The Black-Tailed Prairie Dog.  Journal of Wildlife
     Management, 60:971-973.

Kneeland, M.C., J.L. Koprowski, M.C. Corse.  1995.  Potential predators of Chiricahua
     fox squirrels.  Southwestern Naturalist, 40:340-342.

Koprowski, J.L.  1994.  Sciurus carolinensis. Mammalian Species, 480:1-9. PDF

Koprowski, J.L.  1994.  Sciurus niger.  Mammalian Species, 479:1-9. PDF

Koprowski, J.L.  1993.  Alternative reproductive tactics in male eastern gray squirrels: "Making
     the best of a bad job".  Behavioral Ecology 4:165-171. PDF

Koprowski, J.L.  1993.  Behavioral tactics, copulatory success, and dominance among male fox
     squirrels. Ethology Ecology & Evolution 5:169-176. PDF

Koprowski, J.L.  1993.  The role of kinship in field interactions of juvenile grey squirrels.
    Canadian Journal of Zoology 71:224-226. PDF

Koprowski, J.L.  1993.  Sex and species biases in scent marking by fox squirrels and eastern
     gray squirrels. Journal of Zoology (London) 230:319-323.

Koprowski, J.L.  1993.  Do estrous female gray squirrels, Sciurus carolinensis, advertise their
     receptivity? Canadian Field-Naturalist 106:392-394.

Fairbanks, L., J.L. Koprowski. 1992.  Piscivory in fox squirrels. Prairie Naturalist
     24:283-284.

Koprowski, J.L.  1992.  Removal of copulatory plugs by female tree squirrels. Journal of
     Mammalogy 73:572-576. PDF

Koprowski, J.L.  1991.  Response of fox squirrels and eastern gray squirrels to a late
     spring-early summer food shortage. Journal of Mammalogy 72:367-372.  PDF

Koprowski, J.L.  1991.  Damage due to scent marking by eastern gray and fox squirrels.
     Proceeding of the Great Plains Wildlife Damage Conference 10:101-105.

Koprowski, J.L.  1991.  Mixed-species mating chases of fox squirrels and eastern gray
     squirrels.  Canadian Field- Naturalist 105:117-118.

Koprowski, J.L.  1991.  Book Review: Food hoarding in animals.  Journal of Insect Behavior 4.

Koprowski, J.L.  1989.  Burrow distribution of thirteen-lined ground squirrels in relation to tree
     canopies. Prairie Naturalist 21:185-188.

Koprowski, J.L.  1989.  Book Review: Reproductive success: studies of individual variation in
     contrasting breeding systems.  Journal of Insect Behavior 2:449-450.

Koprowski, J.L., J.L. Roseberry, W.D. Klimstra.  1988.  Longevity records for the fox
     squirrel.  Journal of Mammalogy 69:383-384. PDF

Koprowski, J.L.  1987.  Nocturnal activity of the woodchuck in an urban Ohio park.  Canadian
     Field-Naturalist 101:606-607.

Koprowski, J.L., N.M. Koprowski.  1987.  Joint nest-building in the eastern gray squirrel.
     Canadian Field-Naturalist 101:610-611.

Media Collaborations:

Guest, Birds & Nature, 1330 KPTT Pittsburgh,  45 minute segment
Host, Creature of the Week Discussion, Discovery Channel On-line, 2000
Collaborator on pitch tape with National Geographic TV, May-June 1999
Featured on The World of the Chiricahua Mountains, New Mexico State University, 1998
Featured on Oregon Field Guide, Oregon Public Broadcasting, 1996
Scientific Adviser:
  The Gray Squirrel, Morningstar Productions, 1999
  Tall Tales from a Mountain Slope/Los Rabos Altos de la Ladera by Maria L. Retana, High Desert Productions, Bisbee.

Some Past Research Project Titles:

Ecology of the Endangered Mt. Graham Red Squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis)
     Dates: 2000 to present
     Location: Pinaleno Mountains and White Mountains of Arizona
     Project Description: The Mt. Graham red squirrels is an endangered subspecies of the widespread red squirrel.  Found only in the Pinaleno (AKA Graham) Mountains, the Mt. Graham red squirrel was once thought to have been extirpated (as recently as the late 1960's) from these mountains.  However, subsequent reports verified the existence of a small population in the high elevation forests of the Pinalenos.  After listing as an endangered species in the 1980's, the species has been monitored through regularly quarterly censuses by the University of Arizona's Red Squirrel Monitoring Program.  Presently, we continue this monitoring effort and are invoking on several studies to examine various aspects of red squirrel ecology.  Currently, we are conducting intensive live trapping and radiotelemetric analyses of endangered Mt. Graham red squirrels to learn more about their space use, reproductive tactics and success, demographics, and habitat use.  Meghan Yurenka, an M.S. student, is examining the microclimate of occupied and unoccupied middens to test the idea that middens are cool, moist places to store cones.  Kate Leonard, an M.S. student, is the investigating the impacts of experimental fuel wood removal strategies on the demography of Mt. Graham red squirrels to assess how fire management and squirrel management strategies intersect.  Claire Zugmeyer, an M.S. student, is working on the ecology of MGRS in high elevation spruce-fir forests that have been severely damaged by insects to discover just how a few MGRS have been able to cope with the massive habitat changes induced by insects.  Finally, David Wood, an M.S. student, is endeavoring to link the demography of MGRS collected by radiotelemetric analysis with spatial data from high resolution imagery in a collaborative venture with the UA's Office of Arid Lands and the Univ of Newcastle-upon-Tyne's Centre for Life Science Modeling.

Ecology of Introduced Abert's Squirrels (Sciurus aberti) on Mt.Graham
     Dates: 2001 to present
     Location: Pinaleno Mountains of Arizona
     Project Description: Abert's squirrels were introduced to the Pinaleno Mountains of Arizona in the early 1940's by the Arizona Department of Game and Fish in an effort to enhance hunting opportunities for the populace, a common conservation practice of the time.  By the 1960's, biologists began to note the potential negative impact of this introduction on the native Mt. Graham red squirrel.  Despite these concerns, there have been no published studies on the potential ecological overlap between these species.  Abert's squirrels are often describes as Ponderosa pine obligates; however, we have good evidence that on Mt. Graham the Abert's squirrels are resident in areas that are depauperate of pine.  Andrew Edelman, an M.S. student, examined the space and habitat use of Abert's squirrels using radiotelemetry on Mt. Graham and Nate Gwinn, an M.S. student, is examining the response of Abert's squirrels to fire induced habitat changes.  Current hopes are to initiate an Abert's squirrel removal experiment to assess the role of this exotic species in the decline of endangered Mt. Graham red squirrels.

Ecology of the Arizona Gray Squirrel: an unknown native species AND
Status of the Catalina Gray Squirrel: The implications of introduced Abert's Squirrels
     Dates: 2000 to present
     Location: Huachuca Mountains, Catalina and Rincon Mountains of Arizona
     Project Description: Just as in the previous research project, Abert's squirrels were introduced into the Catalina Mountains just outside of Tucson in the early 1940's.  Sometime after they appear to have colonized the adjacent Rincon Mountains.  In the 1960's concern was expressed over the status of the Catalina Gray Squirrel, a subspecies of the Arizona Gray Squirrel. Few records have been reported in the Catalina Mountains since this time.  Currently, we are revisiting sites where museum specimens have been collected for each species and using hair collection tubes and observations, attempting to document the continued coexistence of both species. Studies in the adjacent Rincon Mountains suggest that Abert's squirrels now dominate the mountains while the native Arizona Gray Squirrel may be relegated to isolated areas. Nichole Cudworth, MS student, has recently extended our efforts to the Huachuca Mountains has initiated live trapping and radiotelemetric studies.

Ecology of Introduced Mexican Red-bellied Squirrels in Biscayne National Park and their impact on an Endangered Palm

Two pairs of Mexican Red-bellied Squirrels (Sciurus aureogaster) were introduced to the 10 km2 Elliott Key in Biscayne National Park, Florida, USA about 70 years ago. The population expanded to the point where it was believed to negatively impact an endangered endemic palm. In 1992, the 7 m tidal surge that accompanied Hurricane Andrew submersed the entire key and the introduced tree squirrel was believed to have been eradicated as a result. Recent anecdotal observations suggested that the population was extant and growing. A visit by one of us (John Koprowski) to the site in March 2005 documented the persistence of the population.  Our study will investigate the distribution, habitat use, and impact on palms of Mexican red-bellied squirrels using drey surveys, live trapping, radiotelemetry, and observation. Field work will be initiated in December 2005 and continue for 2 years.  Geoff Palmer, an MS student, continues to document the ecology of the squirrel and its potential impact on the Sargent's Palm.

The conservation and ecology of Mearns's Squirrel (Tamiasciurus mearnsi) in Sierra San Pedro Martir, Baja California, Mexico

The Mearns's squirrel is an montane island endemic found in the highest regions of Baja California's greatest mountain range at elevations around 3000 m. The species is considered to be threatened in Mexico and no ecological studies have been conducted. In addition, eastern gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) were introduced to lower elevations over 50 years ago and their status is unknown. Related species in the United States typically larderhoard conifer cones. In our first visit to the region in November 2004, we caught glimpses of only two animals and did not find any larderhoards suggesting the behavior and ecology of this species may be quite interesting. Field efforts began spring 2005 the capture and radiocollaring of animals to assess their habitat use and basic ecology.  Nicolas Ramos, a PhD student, will continue this fieldwork into 2008.
 

Conservation and behavioral ecology of the rare Chiricahua fox squirrel
     Dates: 1993 to present
     Location: Chiricahua National Monument, Arizona.
     Project Description:  A Master's student, Bret Pasch, recently completed work on this project incorporating radiotelemetry to examine space and habitat use of this uncommon species. Sandy Doumas, an MS student, is expanding our research to examine the entire Chiricahua Mountain range to assess the use of fire-impacted sites by Mexican fox squirrels. The mountains of the desert southwest function as relatively cool lush islands of forested habitat in a sea of desert.  The Chiricahua Mountains in extreme southeastern Arizona function as one such island and are unique in their location at the southern terminus of the Rocky Mountains and the northern extent of the Sierra Madre.  As a result of this unique location, the diversity of the Chiricahua montane (or sky) island is great.   Chiricahua fox squirrels (Sciurus nayaritensis chiricahuae) are a large bodied subspecies of the Mexican fox squirrel (S. nayaritensis) found only in the Chiricahuas.  Ecological data on Chiricahua fox squirrels is scant and resulted in a listing as a Category 2 species by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (a category that was eliminated by the USFWS).  Our study represents the first ecological study of this montane isolate.  Our efforts focused primarily on habitat use, nest tree selection, activity/movement patterns, and reproductive performance.  However, the large size of this tree squirrel allowed us to examine current ideas on the evolution of sociality in squirrels in relation to body size.  More than 2 dozen undergraduate students have worked on this research project with me over the years and several have produced senior theses from ecological investigations:

    Habitat use and nest site location of Chiricahua fox squirrels--Nicole Michel
    Foraging behavior of male and female Chiricahua fox squirrels--Michele Corse
    Vigilance behavior of Chiricahua fox squirrels in relation to human activity--Mary Kneeland
 

A Comparison of Habitat between Sites Occupied by Black-tailed Prairie Dogs in Sonora and Unoccupied Sites in Arizona
     Dates: 2001 to 2004
     Location:  Grasslands of SE Arizona and Northern Sonora
     Project Description: Black-tailed prairie dogs were extirpated from Arizona early in the 20th century.  BT prairie dog populations appear to be declining significantly throughout their range.  Recently, several relictual populations were rediscovered in northern Sonora just south of Arizona.  Carol Coates, an M.S. student, examined characteristics of these relictual sites with those of sites in the high elevation grasslands of southeastern Arizona.

Juvenile body condition as a proximate mechanism of dispersal and social group formation in tree
    squirrel
     Dates: 1999 to 2001
     Location: Cascade and Coast Ranges of Oregon; Salem, Oregon
     Project Description: This project is a new venture scheduled for Summer 1999.  Group formation in mammals often involves the retention of young in their natal area.  This study examines the hypothesis that body condition is important in the natal dispersal of juvenile eastern gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis), a highly social species, and western gray squirrels (Sciurus griseus), a solitary species.  Western gray squirrels are a threatened species in the State of Washington but are not of conservation concern in Oregon.  The body condition of young will be experimentally enhanced through the provision of supplemental food.  The impact of body condition on the rates of social interaction, group cohesiveness, and dispersal from the birthsite will be examined.  Two undergraduates worked with me during the first year of this project, Scott Howe and Matt Woolsey.  During the summer of 2000, three undergraduates, Ben Hudson, Jason Niedermeyer, and Aaron Tsuha conducted independent research on the project.

                               Click HERE for a research update on this project
 

Ecology and conservation of a social carnivore: sociality of coatis in a xeric environment.
     Dates: 1995 to present
     Location: Chiricahua National Monument, Arizona
     Project Description:  Social systems often vary dependent on the distribution of resources.  White-nosed coatis (Nasua narica) are diurnal social carnivores related to raccoons that range from northern South America to the southwestern deserts of the United States, where they are a species of special concern.  The social system of this species is unique amongst the Carnivora for the larger bodied males are solitary while the smaller females form groups of 10-20 animals.  Evidence from tropical forests suggests that males range over greater areas than females.  The arid mountains of the Arizona deserts provide a vastly different environment with resources much less common and more widely dispersed than in tropical forests.  The objective of this project is to examine the plasticity of social behavior and space use in coatis by examining their ecology in aridlands.  Thusfar, we have documented that home ranges are often 10X greater than those in the tropics and that males and females range equally widely (or during some seasons females range MORE widely than males).  This project has involved more than a dozen undergraduate students, most of whom have completed independent research projects or senior theses on ecological topics using coatis as a model.  Presently, I am collaborating with Maureen McColgin, a Ph.D. student at Purdue University who is examining the mating system of these coatis using molecular techniques.  Past undergraduate student research topics include:

Population Ecology:
    Differential habitat use of male and female coatis--Robin Panzer
    Influence of seed and lizard availability on space use patterns--Erica Brown
    Arthropod availability as a determinant of space use in male and female coatis--Ian Silvernail
    Impacts of El Nino on home range size in male and female coatis--Jessica Girard

Behavioral Ecology:
    Differential space use and patterns of spatial overlap of male and female coatis--Sophia Bickford
    Den site selection of male and female coatis--Maureen McColgin
    Postparturition group formation in adult female coatis--Anna Eilers

Conservation:
    Impacts of fire on habitat use by coatis--Suzanne Piluso
  Influence of human activity on coatis in a National Monument--Jed Jorgenson

Conservation and behavioral ecology of the rare Chiricahua fox squirrel
     Dates: 1993 to present
     Location: Chiricahua National Monument, Arizona.
     Project Description:  A Master's student, Bret Pasch, is working on this project incorporating radiotelemetry to examine space and habitat use of this uncommon species. The mountains of the desert southwest function as relatively cool lush islands of forested habitat in a sea of desert.  The Chiricahua Mountains in extreme southeastern Arizona function as one such island and are unique in their location at the southern terminus of the Rocky Mountains and the northern extent of the Sierra Madre.  As a result of this unique location, the diversity of the Chiricahua montane (or sky) island is great.   Chiricahua fox squirrels (Sciurus nayaritensis chiricahuae) are a large bodied subspecies of the Mexican fox squirrel (S. nayaritensis) found only in the Chiricahuas.  Ecological data on Chiricahua fox squirrels is scant and resulted in a listing as a Category 2 species by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (a category that was eliminated by the USFWS).  Our study represents the first ecological study of this montane isolate.  Our efforts focused primarily on habitat use, nest tree selection, activity/movement patterns, and reproductive performance.  However, the large size of this tree squirrel allowed us to examine current ideas on the evolution of sociality in squirrels in relation to body size.  More than 2 dozen undergraduate students have worked on this research project with me over the years and several have produced senior theses from ecological investigations:

    Habitat use and nest site location of Chiricahua fox squirrels--Nicole Michel
    Foraging behavior of male and female Chiricahua fox squirrels--Michele Corse
    Vigilance behavior of Chiricahua fox squirrels in relation to human activity--Mary Kneeland

Interspecific competition, seed removal, and population dynamics of mammalian granivores in
    an oak-fir ecosystem
     Dates: 1992-1995

Social organization and habitat use of the collared peccary, Chiricahua National Monument, AZ
     Dates: 1994-1995

Conflict between the sexes: social organization in tree squirrels, Univ. of Kansas
     Dates: 1986-1992

Demography of fox squirrels in a small urban woodlot, Southern Illinois University (w/W.D.
    Klimstra)
     Dates: 1983-1985

Teaching Experience:

Associate Professor of Wildlife Science                                                        Aug 2000-Present
Director of the Mt. Graham Red Squirrel Monitoring Program
    Wildlife and Fisheries Science
    School of Renewable Natural Resources
    University of Arizona
    Tucson, AZ  8572

 Courses:Wildlife Management: Mammalian Species, Biogeography and Conservation of the Sky Islands,
Applications of Behavioral Ecology to Conservation Biology, Natural Resources Ecology

Associate Professor of Biology                                                                       Aug 1997-Aug 2000
Assistant Professor of Biology                                                                        Aug 1992-Aug 1997
    Department of Biology
    Willamette University
    Salem, OR 97301

 Courses:General Ecology, Behavioral Ecology, Biological Diversity, Topics in Conservation Biology,
Topics in Mammalogy, Field Zoology, Vertebrate Zoology, Field Studies in Ecuador,  Evolutionary Biology, Life Forms 2: Biology of Higher Organisms, Senior Research Seminar, Perspectives in Biology, Comparative Vert  Morphology,  Marine Mammals, Principles of Biology, .

Courtesy Assistant Professor of Biology                                                           Mar 1995 - Present
    Department of Fish and Wildlife
    Oregon State University
    Corvallis, OR 97331

 Courses:Ecological Consequences of Habitat Fragmentation

Lecturer
    Department of Biology
    University of Missouri-Kansas City    Aug 1991 - May 1992
    Kansas City, MO 64110

 Courses:Vertebrate Zoology, Evolution, Mammals of Kansas City, Urban Wildlife

Graduate Teaching Assistant
    Department of Systematics & Ecology
    University of Kansas                         Jan 1986 - May 1991
    Lawrence, KS  66045

 Courses:Laboratory in Experimental Ecology, Honors Intro Biology Laboratory,
  Honors Physiology Laboratory, Animal Behavior Laboratory, Intro Biology Discussions

Adjunct Biology Faculty
    Department of Biology                      Aug 1988 - Dec 1989
    Kansas City Kansas Community College
    Kansas City, KS 66012

 Course: General Biology

Updated 12 February 2004
John L. Koprowski

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