The University of Arizona

Jim SprinkleJim Sprinkle

Area Extension Agent in Animal Sciences
Gila County Cooperative Extension Director

P. O. Box 2844
Payson, Arizona 85547
Phone: 928-474-4160
Fax: 928-468-8289
email: sprinkle@ag.arizona.edu
website: http://ag.arizona.edu/gila/animalsciences

Degrees

Jim Sprinkle was raised on a livestock farm in Southwestern Va., received an Associate degree in horsemanship and stable management at Ricks College in 1980 and was in the horse business for eight years before going back to school at age 33.

During his doctorate work Sprinkle worked out of the Texas A & M Research Station at Uvalde (west of San Antonio) under Dr. Bill Holloway. He was also advised by Dr. Wayne Greene. Other committee members included Dr. David Forbes, Dr. Jerry Stuth, and Dr. Bill Ellis. Sprinkle was responsible for two major projects there. The first one was in cooperation with Dr. Cal Ferrell at the USDA-Meat Animal Research Center at Clay Center, Nebraska.

The project at USDA-MARC looked at differences in fat partitioning and fat enzyme activities among breed types varying in their adaptability to the subtropics. The second project examined range cows at Uvalde and compared lactating and non-lactating Brahman x Angus, Angus, and Tuli x Angus cows for differences in forage intake, digestive kinetics, grazing behavior, fat enzyme activity, and body temperature during early and late summer grazing trials.

In 1995, Sprinkle accepted his current position with the University of Arizona as an Area Extension Agent in Animal Science. He is headquartered in Payson and covers primarily Yavapai and Gila counties but also works statewide in cooperation with other extension agents. In 2002, he added the additional responsibility of Gila County Cooperative Extension Director, supervising 3 Extension offices. In 2005, Sprinkle also assumed duties as a regional specialist for the Department of Animal Sciences at the University of Arizona.

Research Interests

Most of his work deals with range monitoring, range issues with agencies, range beef cow production, and range nutrition. His main Extension program is in administering the “Reading the Range” monitoring program, encompassing about 197 key areas on 37 ranches covering approximately 1,041,384 acres. The data collected is used to assist in management actions and to help establish collaborative relationships between agency and ranching partners.

His current research is in the area of beef cattle trace mineral nutrition. Sprinkle has helped secure over $644,000 in grants to support extension programs and research. He has also authored or coauthored 6 referred journal articles, 30 referred Extension publications, 19 abstracts, 11 proceedings papers, 5 educational handbooks, 87 Extension reports, 5 software decision packages, 2 videotapes, and various newsletters, posters, and brochures.

Sprinkle and his wife Barbara are the proud parents of seven children and two grandchildren.

to top