Recent CALS Spotlights

  • The bond between mother and child has long been recognized as critical to children's development, but what about Dad?

    Increasingly, scientists have turned their attention to the role of fathers in the family. It's a timely topic, as an estimated one-third of U.S. children grow up in homes without their biological dads, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.    

    At the University of Arizona, researchers are investigating the role of fathers under the Fathers, Parenting and Families Initiative, a research and education effort within the Frances McClelland Institute for Children, Youth, and Families.

  • Two University of Arizona professors have received the highest honor bestowed on faculty in the Arizona state university system.

    The appointment of Bruce Tabashnik and Julia Clancy-Smith as Regents’ Professors, approved recently by the Arizona Board of Regents, brings to 99 the UA’s number of Regents' Professors since the designation was created in 1987. The honor is reserved for faculty scholars who have achieved national and international distinction for their work.

  • Researchers in the University of Arizona's BIO5 Institute have entered into a collaboration with Johnson & Johnson Consumer & Personal Products and Janssen Biotech Inc. to leverage foundational discovery research aimed at determining environmental factors that underlie asthma and allergies.

    The project's goal is to identify compounds present in dust in the farm environment that may be protective against asthma. Findings from this study could lead to the development of medicines to prevent the disease.

  • The University of Arizona again served as Official Knowledge Partner to the 2015 Global Forum for Innovations in Agriculture held in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, this spring. With 102 countries represented at the Forum — launched just a year ago — the GFIA has become one of the world's most influential global platforms for scientists, entrepreneurs and policymakers to present and explore innovations toward sustainable agriculture and food security.

    UA-sponsored exhibits have included various controlled environment agriculture greenhouse technologies, a patented algal bioreactor for biofuels and aquaculture systems.

  • Shane Burgess has an answer for those who say it’s time to drop cotton from Arizona’s "five C’s" for the demands it places on water resources.

    Not so fast.

    Although farmers planted more than 161,000 acres of cotton in Arizona in 2013 — the second-highest total for any crop in the state — irrigated farmland actually has decreased in recent decades with improvements in technology and crop engineering.

  • As the world's population of older adults increases, so do conversations around successful aging — including seniors' physical, mental and social well-being.

    A variety of factors can impact aging adults' quality of life. Two big ones, according to new research from the University of Arizona, are the health and cognitive functioning of a person's spouse.

    Analyzing data from more than 8,000 married couples — with an average age in the early 60s — researchers found that the physical health and cognitive functioning of a person's spouse can significantly affect a person's own quality of life.

  • Part of the reason American shoppers are so attracted to wholesale shopping is their belief that bulk-buying not only prevents waste but can save time and money, providing more value for the dollar.

    However, results from a qualitative investigation by the University of Arizona of buying habits suggest that the opposite may be true.

    Victoria Ligon, who earned her master's degree from the UA Retailing and Consumer Sciences Program, studied food purchasing and preparation habits of U.S. consumers for her thesis, finding that those in the study tended to buy too much food and waste more of it than they realized. Ligon has begun doctoral studies in the program.

  • As he registered some time ago for the inaugural Pan American Conference on thoroughbred breeding and racing, scheduled to coincide in New York with the fabled Belmont Stakes, Doug Reed allowed himself a momentary flight of fancy.

    "Wouldn’t it be neat," he thought, "if there was the possibility of a Triple Crown winner?"

    Reed, coordinator of the Race Track Industry Program at the University of Arizona, got his wish — and so much more — at Saturday’s 147th running of the Belmont in Elmont, New York.

  • Dr. Jimmye S. Hillman, former head of the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, passed away from complications of a stroke on June 4th, 2015.

    George Frisvold, specialist in agricultural and resource economics, interviewed Dr. Hillman in 2004. An excerpt from this interview is republished here.

    Born and raised in rural Mississippi, Dr. Hillman first joined the faculty of the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Arizona in 1950, serving as Head of the department from 1961 to 1990. Dr. Hillman’s research interests centered on agricultural and trade policies.

  • His "favorite office," in his words, was the tide pools along the rocky coast of Monterey, California.

    Following the example of marine biologist Ed Ricketts, whom he admired, Raphael "Rafe" Sagarin spent much of his time as an aspiring marine ecologist observing and studying these microcosms teeming with life, pounded by waves at one moment, only to slowly evaporate under the scorching sun in the next, until they were washed over by the returning tide — all in the course of a day.